GOODBYE MOUSIE PDF

Goodbye Mousie by Robie H. Harris – One morning a boy finds that his pet, Mousie, won’t wake up. The truth is Mousie has died. At first the boy doesn’t believe. Margaret K. McElderry Books/Simon & Schuster Books for Children, September Illustrated by Jan Ormerod. GOODBYE MOUSIE is a book that was in my. Booklist Online Book Review: Goodbye , Robie H. (author). Illustrated by Jan OrmerodSept. 32p.

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Goodbye Mousie

Preview — Goodbye Mousie by Robie H. Goodbye Mousie by Robie H. One morning a boy finds that his pet, Mousie, won’t wake up. The truth is Mouise has died. At first the boy doesn’t believe it. He gets very mad at Mousie for dying, and then he feels very sad.

But talking about Mousie, burying Mousie in a special box, and saying good-bye helps this boy begin to feel better about the loss of his beloved pet. Paperback32 pages. Published November 1st by Aladdin first published To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

To ask other readers questions about Goodbye Mousieplease sign up. Lists with This Book. Oct 23, paula rated it it was amazing. This is the closest thing to a perfect death-of-a-pet book I’ve ever seen. Goobdye euphemisms, no metaphors, abundant acknowledgement of the validity of a small child’s feelings – goidbye sorrow and anger.

Wonderful pencil and watercolor drawings by perhaps my favorite realistic illustrator of all time – Jan Ormorod – are the perfect accompaniment to Robie Harris’s sympathetic but no-nonsense text. Jousie 11, Shannon Filidis rated it it was amazing Shelves: This realistic fiction children’s book is intended for children between the ages of three and six mousoe through 2nd grade.

This book is about a little boy who lost his pet mouse. Throughout the story the boy’s parents are trying to get him to understand that “Mousie” passed away and will not come back. I rated this book hoodbye out of five stars because I think it does a great job at explaining the topic of death to younger children.

Goodbye Mousie, by Robie H. Harris | Booklist Online

Death is inevitable, and everyone has to go through it. Teachin This realistic fiction children’s book is intended for children between the ages of three and six pre-k through 2nd grade. Teaching children about death is the only way they will truly understands what happens when a mousid member or a friend passes away.

This book shows the passing of a pet, which children also have to face in life. The book has easy text and easy vocabulary to help younger children better understand what has happened in the story. To me, I feel that explaining the death of a pet first, before the death of a human, can also better help children have a better and more clear understanding of death.

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This book does have color throughout it, so it is not dull and sad for children to read. If we do not explain death to our children, it will be harder for them to understand the passing of someone when the time comes. May 23, Kristen McBee rated it really liked it Shelves: Good depiction of the anger and sadness that we feel when we lose someone we love.

She mentions how we sometimes think our loved one will still be here, say when we wake up in the morning, but he will not be.

Goodbye Mousie : Robie H. Harris :

And no sugaring it up with heaven. Oct 03, Pei rated it really liked it. This book helps kids to understand sad concept of losing a pet, mouie a young child’s perspective.

The prose is very nice, and possesses an easy-to understand format. And each page is filled with beautiful color illustrations.

Mar 08, Anna rated it really liked it Shelves: This is a book that does not address what happens to the soul after we die. It doesn’t discuss things godbye heaven, and whether mice go there. I prefer books that don’t talk about heaven, so that was a plus.

I think that’s better left up the the goodbyye family to discuss. The book addresses what those of us who are left behind deal with. There are some helpful parts to the book. Losing someone you love can lead to mouske, anger, sadness, and a need to do something to honor the one who was lost This is a book that does not address what happens to the soul after we die.

Losing someone you love can lead to denial, anger, sadness, and a need to do something to honor the one who was lost and deal with your grief.

This is shown in a way that can help young children process this. However, I have mixed feelings about a lot of what the book does.

I don’t believe someone who has died will be experiencing things like hunger or boredom anymore. I see nothing wrong with burying a mouse with food and toys, but I do see something wrong in suggesting that otherwise the poor dead creature would have been suffering without these things. I discussed with C that when someone dies, they mosie NOT be feeling things like hunger or boredom anymore.

I thought the ending was very appropriate – it honors the feelings we have when we lose someone. In our family’s recent losses, C has not been able to hold or bury anyone after they died, so the process of an actual burial in the book was not itself helpful to understanding our experiences, though the process of having some kind of memorial is still relevant for us.

Feb 16, Peacegal rated it really liked it Shelves: Unfortunately, our culture often sees pets, especially small ones, as replaceable. Goodbye Mousie is a breath of fresh air in this regard. The text acknowledges even grief for a small pet is difficult and legitimate. A young boy wakes up one morning and finds his pet mouse has passed away during the night. They allow him work through his feeling Unfortunately, our culture often sees pets, especially small ones, as replaceable. They allow him work through his feelings in his own way.

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I was also pleased to see the author realize that replacement of a living being is not immediate or required. Many pet loss books depict their main characters gooebye purchasing a new pet at the conclusion.

As evidenced by Mousie and other sensitive pet goodbey books, thank goodness some take a different view. Aug 26, Mindy rated it it was ok. Goodbye Mousie is in the bibliotherapy genre. It is about a little boy who wakes up to find his pet mouse has died.

The little boy’s dad tells the little boy that Mousie died and tries to comfort his son. The little boy in this books goes through many moisie.

At first, he is mad at Mousie for dying. Then he is sad. The poor little boy cries and cries. Then his parents help him create a tombstone goodbje give him a box to put Mousie in. The little boy feels better goodbyd he places food, toys, and a p Goodbye Mousie is in the bibliotherapy genre.

The little boy feels better when he places food, toys, and a picture of him in Mousies box. Then the boy decorates the outside of the box. Then the boy and his parents bury the box. Once again the boy mouise mad and sad. The boy understands that when he wakes up tomorrow, Mousie will not be there. He thinks he might get another mouse some day. This book is definitely geared toward young children. I might even allow the goodbue to respond to the book by creating some kind of art project in memory of the lost pet, similar to the box decorated in the story.

I would have the children describe times when they felt sad or mad. Then we would talk about how to deal with those emotions. Mar 23, Andrew rated it it was amazing Shelves: A little boy wakes up one morning and tickles his pet mouse’s tummy, but Mousie doesn’t move. So begins this story for the very youngest about the death of a pet. Daddy tells the boy that Mousie is dead, but the child prefers to think that Mousie is just very, very tired.

Slowly, after lots of tears and many questions, the goldbye comes to terms with the fact that his pet is gone. He plans for the funeral by painting jousie picture of himself to put inside the shoebox that will hold Mousie. He will get another pet, but not right away.

Ormerod’s honest pictures, black-pencil line drawings with watercolor washes on buff-colored paper, capture the emotions of the situation goodbyw chronicle the boy’s move from disbelief to acceptance. The endpapers, on which Mousie cavorts, show what a delightful little pet he was.